Using the 4K2F to test your design

Using the 4K2F to test your design

The Four Keys to FUN

Using the 4K2F to test your #gamification design

4K2F

Despite what some #Gamification experts (yes, I’m talking to you Andzrej) fun is an important element. NOW… Andzrej Marczewski is NOT wrong: Fun must be experienced as a consequence of the experience. Do not FORCE it. So, how do you design for it?

Nicole Lazzarro made this amazing thing called the FOUR KEYS TO FUN where she explains there are FOUR different kinds of FUN:

  1. EASY FUN: The simplest kinds of fun. Popping bubble wrap, tearing up the paper of a plastic bottle, flipping a coin just for the sound, ringing the bell at the front desk. These are simple tasks that reward each player with simple and easy laughs… or at least a smile.
  2. SERIOUS FUN: The kind of FUN you have when you are actually engaged in something. Let’s say you are in a meeting with your boss, you are making decisions and are being  taken seriously. You feel empowered and you suddenly realize you could be doing this more often. THAT is serious fun. Regardless of you laughing, you are actually feeling happy and want to be in that “zone”. It’s really relatable to the feeling of FLOW.
  3. PEOPLE FUN: Everything we do is always more FUN with someone else. I try not to go into detail here, but it’s really all about making connection and social engagement. Imagine last scenario without your boss, other people in the room or a market to throw your ideas to. When we interact with others, we have a lot of emotional rewards. When we do that as part of a team, that’s really fun.
  4. HARD FUN: How about long term rewards? How do you feel after working with your team on a VERY long project that finally came ouyt and everything went ok? That experience can’t be bought by money. The feeling is close to “FIERO” which comes exactly after FLOW. The fun you have when achieving HARD work

 

 

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

14 + 1 =

Testing your design

Testing your design

Testing your design

How to know you are going in the right direction

Knowing you are doing the right thing in #Gamification is really hard when you don’t have the right tools at hand. Now, the first thing you should keep in mind are your KPIs. These little guys will tell if ANY project is going in the right direction, however, one thing is the business side of the system and a different the gamified side. When building your system first hand, before ANY data comes in (which is ultimately the one and only compass you must follow) there are a couple of toys you can use to see the north:

Dynamics.

In our Game master framework, the first thing you do is build the game dynamics. Each of them provide a simple question to see if you have dealt with all basic components of a gamified system:

  • Narrative > Why are the players here?
  • Environment > How do the players feel? Are they playing together or against each other?
  • Win State > How do you know you win/finish the game? At what point can I call a victory or a defeat?
  • Progression > How do I know if I’m going forward or backwards? Do you provide enough feedback to your players?
  • Relationships > How do players play between them and by themselves? Are there enough tools that will allow them to play?
  • Boundaries > How long and where can the players play?

SAPS

Introduced by Gabe Zichermann, this simple model helps you check that your rewards are in place and well done:

  1. STATUS: It refers to a position of a player in relation to the rest. This DO NOT mean at any point better or worse. Status as a reward can be received in many different ways.
  2. ACCESS: Players gain access to information, items, objects, experiences or anything that NOT all players do. STATUS can grant ACCESS to some place (like a palace or the store in front) therefore killing two stones with one bird
  3. POWER: The word EMPOWERMENT applies too. The ability to do something not all players can. STATUS can grant ACCESS to information that gives the player POWER to make decisions other players can’t (for example)
  4. STUFF: Things not all players have. Things players earn by completing tasks, quests or challenges. STATUS can grant ACCESS to a place where the player has the POWER to use the information he earlier gained to earn STUFF they couldn’t get anywhere else.

When using SAPS make sure players receive rewards that are well rounded in all FOUR types. STUFF can be perceived as money (and it usually is). Not the best way to reward players because by human nature, MONEY IS NEVER ENOUGH!

4K2F

Nicole Lazzarro made this amazing thing called the FOUR KEYS TO FUN where she explains FOUR different kinds of FUN:

  1. EASY FUN: Curiosity, surprise, wonder, awe. This are basic elements to consider. Everybody likes having simple fun.
  2. SERIOUS FUN: Excitement, Zen focus, engagement. The feeling you get when doing something you like.
  3. PEOPLE FUN: Amusement, Admiration, teamwork. Everything is more fun with someone else, right?
  4. HARD FUN: Frustration, Fiero, relief. How good does it feel when finishing off a hard project? There. That’s it.

Inclusion

This part refers to the player types and the differences. Make sure to include them in your design as well. We based our framework in the use of the HEXAD from Andrzej Marczewski. All details can be found in his website and in one of the following posts.

The Hexad covers basically 6 different type of players. Based on the work by Richard Bartle, Marczewski proposes four intrinsically motivated player types and 2 additional ones: The player/user type and the disruptor.

  1. Achiever: Motivated by MASTERY, this type of player will try to achieve EVERYTHING in the system (finish each and every quest). Think of them as the “A” student, always in front of the class, always studying. Favorite question: “Am I the only who read the instructions?”
  2. Philantropist: Motivated by PHILANTROPIC PURPOSE. Really important to make the difference. These players will want to help others just because they want to. They also like to be or lead teams in order to accomplish meaningful goals. Great Leaders. Favorite question: “Why won’t you separate plastic?”
  3. Socialiser: Motivated by RELATEDNESS, this players will want to connect with as many others as possible. They love social games, cooperation and competition as long as it means connecting with more players. Favorite question: “So what’s the best place to party around here?”
  4. Free-Spirit: Motivated by AUTONOMY they will want to follow their hearts through the game. They use their guts as guidance and love to explore EVERYTHING that seems explorable. Favorite question: “Can I go to the top of the mountain?”

Now, this are just 4 different ways to test your design. We are missing the most crucial one, but we’ll talk about it in another post. This one is already too long.

 

 

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

7 + 15 =

The effects of violent video games

The effects of violent video games

The effects of violent video games

Hard-core players of violent video games do not have emotionally blunted brains

I read this information a while back, but I wanted to share it with you.

Violent GAMES do NOT, I repeat, DO N-O-T, cause aggression.

The full article is here (please, support them by clicking) and you can read even further  here 

It’s great to know this because the brain KNOWS the difference between killing polygons and people. So please tell your parents about it.

Let everyone know that according to an FMRI study:

Excessive users of violent video games do not show emotional desensitization

Abstract

Playing violent video games have been linked to long-term emotional desensitization. We hypothesized that desensitization effects in excessive users of violent video games should lead to decreased brain activations to highly salient emotional pictures in emotional sensitivity brain regions. Twenty-eight male adult subjects showing excessive long-term use of violent video games and age and education matched control participants were examined in two experiments using standardized emotional pictures of positive, negative and neutral valence. No group differences were revealed even at reduced statistical thresholds which speaks against desensitization of emotion sensitive brain regions as a result of excessive use of violent video games.

SOURCE:  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11682-016-9549-y?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals
Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

3 + 15 =

Thre Paradox of #gamification design

Thre Paradox of #gamification design

The Paradox of #gamification design

The harder for the game master the easier for the player... at least in theory...

The Paradox

The harder for the Game Master, the easier for the players.

This idea came to me as a Dungeons and Dragons Game Master (which is pretty much the one skill you need to become a gamification designer). The thing is that the amount of rules the game master has to know is gigantic. A good Game Master goes on to read at least three complete manuals (that’s aroun 300 pages each) while the player can simply get his character sheet and simply play the game.

When you are a Game Master you have to build scenarios of possibilities. You N-E-V-E-R (and I can’t stress this enough) know how your players will play. They will use your own rules against you whenever possible.

Now, the paradox is there to tell you that the more time you invest in developing a #gamification system the more your players will be able to take from it.

However another thing comes to mind: Rules must be simple. Story however, can be as complex as it may.

Simple is VERY different from easy (golf, bowling, soccer). A simple set of rules will ensure your players stay bound by them without too much thought, but if the story is complex and has many plots and turns, players will focus on it rather than the rules.

Now, if the rules MUST be complicated, then use a tutorial, DO NOT throw all of them at once. If it’s a system that will be played over months or years, take the first three to four weeks to get the players on board (Yes, the ON-BOARDING phase that Yu Kai and Andrzej talk about).

The other problem is that you are NOT dealing with characters in a fictional space where physics don’t apply. You are tending to human beings who are as complex as possible and will seek all opportunities to cheat, game, defeat or whatever the system. It is a common phrase around game designers: “You should always design for cheaters”.

Make sure players can only “cheat” under YOUR terms. Think of the law principle that states that whatever is not forbidden is allowed, so always design with that rule in mind.

Can your players repeat a quest 20 times and level up each time? Should your players figure that out by themselves? Should the difficulty of the game rely on everyone behaving?

People LOVE rules. Rules help us keep it together and make sure to point out who isn’t playing by them.

Remember there is a HUGE line between making mistakes and cheating. One is completely OK, the last one should not allow the players to continue.

Take this four things into account always

  • Make it FAIR
  • Keep it Simple (stupid! –> K.I.S.S.)
  • Make complex plots
  • What’s not forbidden is allowed

What do you think? Is there anything else you should be thinking with this paradox?

 

Also read The Paradox of Play by Andrzej Marczewski

 

 

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

3 + 3 =

The power of ALMOST

The power of ALMOST

The power of #almost

Why retrying should be encouraged

In #gamification we all know about FLOW. That feeling you get when you #almost achieve a goal but feel that you are actually about to get it. In proper terms, FLOW is where the difficulty of a challenge matches the skill of the player, however,  I want to talk about how players feel when they almost achieve their goals.

The feeling of fiero, that thing you do with your arms when your team scores a goal or how people feel at the end of a marathon, comes after a lot of hard work and expectation. Normally you can feel this via proxy, but when it comes to building experiences that make the players feel like that is a complete different story.

Trying to explain it through fancy terms as FLOW and FIERO will take a lot of time. The simplest way is to understand how YOU feel when you are attempting something and ALMOST achieve it. When we are faced with a challenge that matches our abilities (or close to match them) we get excited and want to actually do it.

Whatever activity you are havign the players do, make sure it goes according to their level of tolerance to frustration. If something is too hard, you let it go, you feel disappointed and look for easier challenges, if they are too easy, you get bored and lose interest because there is no challenge. That is wher ALMOST sums all I want to say really simple.

As long as the player is ALMOST capable to get the task done, they will want to try as many times as possible. When they finally achieve it then move to the next challenge with the same feeling. The magic number is 3 to 5 times. If it takes more than 5 times to get it right people will usually start feeling frustrated, although this completely depends on the person, 5 is perfectly reasonable. If it takes less than 3, then it might be too easy. This projection escaltes to the amount of challenges that must be easy or hard accordingly. So if 5 or more tasks in a row are super easy, then the player might get bored, but if less than 3 in a row, they might feel its too hard.

This numbers are NOT hard or strict and they should be dynamic. maybe first you give 5 easy tasks, then 2 hard ones then 3 easy then 4 hards and so on… Easy tasks taking one or two attempts and hard ones less than 5 (most of the time)

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

8 + 15 =

Your Runner Level

Your Runner Level

So, what is your level as a runner?

Calculating the level of players in #gamification is not easy. Here are some thoughts on how to do it.

I was thinking about this when talking to my wife about her growth in running. So, to explain how to calculate the progression and levels of your players, I will use some sports as an example. Why sports in #gamifiication? Simple, they aren’t called Olympic G-A-M-E-S because people compete from the office right?

Sports are the best examples on how to apply game mechanics. You should pay close attention and analyze them. It will make wonders for your #gamification design.

Now, defining what level you are, as a sports-person, one would say it’s impossible to put a number to it. Right but wrong. Depending on the type of WIN STATE it can be either easy or complicated to define the level of the players. I will only focus on the WIN STATE that is via GOAL since in a POINTS WIN STATE it gets tricky how to define it, specially if we talk teams (like what’s the level of a soccer player and why is that level).

When a goal has been set, it’s easy to use it as a reference and defining levels becomes really easy.

Let me explain with an image and people who run distance. 

Ok, so the image shows a graph where every KM a player runs gives them a level. It’s easy to define as most runners will train to a marathon or half a marathon.

As long as you define your goal and WIN STATE clearly, you can setup your leveling up system fairly easy if you focus on the CORE ability your players should be developing as they grow.

You can see how TIME doesn’t matter until they cross the MAX DISTANCE line. The red player is a level 46 runner (not 42) as his speed helps him move. However, the orange runner is Level 50 because she ran 50 KM and she is being judged by a longer distance metric.

Now, how to measure the level of the same runners but in terms of speed? Here is another image:

Here we have the same runners but very different results and a different scale of level progression (max level can’t be seen [Usain Bolt 9:58]).

However, in the distance graphic, there is a point where the core element of measure can be swithched to speed to make a difference between high level runners. In the SPRINT, distance is always fixed, so to increase the level the player MUST reduce the speed.

Now, decreasing speed from 30 seconds to 29 is easy but from 9:88 to 9:87 it may be nigh impossible. So you must make sure the scale matches the difficulty of the challenge.

If you are a runner, you will understand this scale immediately and define one that fits what players experience.

Simply put:

 

YOU NEED TO DO RESEARCH!!!!

If you want players to feel the real progress and experience it fairly, you NEED to know why the levels are there and why you defined such scale.

In the end the player’s profile should be something like this:

I really hope this example can help you define a proper level-up system for your #gamification strategy 🙂

May the force be with you. Let me know what you think via twitter or in the comments 😀

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of February 2017, I occupy the 18th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

12 + 6 =

#Gamemechanics – Time Category

#Gamemechanics – Time Category

Time Category #gamemechanics

How long will the players have to overcome all challenges.

Time should not only be perceived as minutes, seconds or days. In #gamification we see time as a lot more than that.

For instance, the fact that a player has a set number of attempts to overcome a challenge is one thing (which does define the time), however, what if you say “the first to accomplish”.

Time doesn’t have to be set as a number of days, although using normal time might be the easiest thing, in #gamification it just refers to how long, how many times and/or when can the players play.

As I said before, turns are a great way to set the time for a challenge. We will all take turns to attempt this, but with the following order.

When you use this #gamemechanic, make sure you are FAIR in how players earn their turn. If it’s a random thing (alphabetical order by last name IS random, nobody chose theirs), make sure everyone has at least one try. You can then offer a sudden death for all those who overcome with the same results or just define the winner by performance.

Turns based games are often slower than others. You have to wait in line for the guy in front to attempt and if there is no time limit to his turn it could be days before your chance. If you are using the “first guy to make it” mechanic and I know I can do it, but the guy in front gets it first even before I attempt it, then it will feel really unfair (you even think he knew before or had help)

Make sure when using turns EVERYONE gets a shot at it, at least once and each attempt is equally fair for all (or at least all players can have the same level of ability before attempting).

 

One thing is the order in which you attempt and a very different thing is how many times you can try to overcome.

Not much detail to get into, but make sure, as always, to make it fair for everyone. If you are giving three attempts, EVERYONE either gets them or has the ability/possibility to get as many. If you earn attempts depending on performance, make sure it’s available for all and it’s not harder for some.

This #gamemechanic does refer to time as literal.

How many seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months or years does the player have to master the system or overcome a challenge.

Easy to think about it that way, how about thinking a different thing that most people forget:

What is the FASTEST they can do it?

When I started gamifying my classroom, I thought my players will take the whole semester to finish my challenges (ha!). Little did I know about the power and impact #gamification has on high school students. Two months in my players had eaten ALL the content I proudly prepared for the semester and I had no way of feeding their content demand as fast.

The result?

My system collapsed and had to resort to old practices to level the class… sad right?

I learned that defining your time limit BOTH ways is crucial for a system to be successful.

Set boundaries to the time players CAN and HAVE to finish. This way you won’t be surprised by some players saying they went through all the content overnight when you wanted them to go through it for five weeks.

 

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

6 + 12 =

#Gamemechanics – Space Category

#Gamemechanics – Space Category

Space Category #gamemechanics

The place where the players play.

So where are the players playing? Is there a board? An app? A website? An imaginary place on their heads?

Yes, the last one is real, although you would have to define some BOUNDARIES on to what is acceptable, however when thinking of the SPACE where the players play, there are no limits.

Thanks to technology and creativity, players can play through and absolutely ANYWHERE. Don’t restrain yourselft.

Now, in terms fo #gamification and #gamemechanics, we’ve separated three that include each other somehow, so basically you would need to define all three (not hard at all)

Easy, normal or hard mode are pretty much the easiest way to explain this mechanic. The stage is not physical but environmental. It refers to the type of field the players are in.

An easy way to resemble is the Ice stage vs the Lava stage of a game. It’s not just about difficulty, but about what abilities the players will need to overcome the challenges.

When you offer the players different stages of growth they will try to play where they are best at. So we could make the stage the class the players are in. People often think math is the hard class and art the easy one, but what if we put the same strict rules in both classes. Players who are good at math will think the Math class is easy while art is really hard and others might think P.E. is the hardest.

As long as rules apply to all players equally, the difference in difficulty will not be the STAGE itself, but the preference and abilities of the players.

Now, talking about difficulty would be another thing: If the difficulty level increases, the system should be harder no matter what STAGE you are on (or maybe the stage is not a change of environment but a new challenging level)

Remember to balance it for all players. Here are just some tips on how you can define your STAGES:

  • The environment can be related to the difficulty but it’s not forceful.
  • Difficulty increases the challenge for all fields and players regardless of the environment.
  • Stage is defined by the abilities players need to overcome the challenge(s).
  • Always do your stages by reverse engineering from the abilities point of view, this will let you know how hard or easy and what moment is good for the players to be faced against such challenge.

 

It could literally be a field. Like in sports. However the point is that this is the BIGGER SPACE where the players deposit DATA.

The field is where they literally the place where they play and interact. EVERY SINGLE place where the players can play: the street, the room, the office, the website, the blackboard in a classroom or all of the above.

Think of the field as the playing board. Think big and creatively. There is no limit on where can data be input.

In Dungeons and Dragons, game masters usually put figurines on a board with squares to represent the position of the players, same with chess or pretty much any BOARD game, however the FIELD in Dungeons and Dragons lies within the Game Master’s notebook where he has planned almost every scenario and every PLACE the players will be. So the board can be just squares, but it’s not the field. The field, is the world the players are in.

So, how will you track the progress of the player? How do you know if you are winning on chess? How do you know how good you are performing?

The pieces are the tools that will tell the player where they are. In more technical terms, they are tools used to track player’s progress. I know, all #gamemechanics are that right? Yes and no. This refers to a more “physical” element that will show the players their position.

Now, each piece can have their own set of rules (mechanics) and at the same time each piece will give a different piece of data to both, players and system.

I said before that these three #gamemechanics are connected to each other and its most likely you will end up defining all three always. The reason is as follows:

You can’t have a stage without a field without pieces to track where and how the players have grown through it. In a classroom the pieces might be the student standing in front of you (the player) but they could also be those little cardboard pieces you gave them to track their progress.

The virtual currency is not a piece in the field (unless its part of the mechanics), but the hat that tells you where you have to pay rent is. That way, the piece tells the player everything they need to know at that specific moment. The card of the property explaining the amount of money to be paid is another piece in the board.

 You put the pieces in the field and let the players feel the stage.

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

4 + 10 =

#Gamemechanics – Solo Category

#Gamemechanics – Solo Category

Solo Category #gamemechanics

The relationship between the player and the system. Mechanics that define the player by itself.

The player must have a set of mechanics applied directly to her. All other mechanics we’ve checked apply to the system and the player interacts with the system, however there are elements, that will give each player a simple way of knowing where they stand.

 

Using a tutorial is somehting that each player must be able to do completely on their own. Guiding the player through a part of your system where she won’t need to interact with anyone else but the system is one of the best (if not the best) wayof bringing the players through the On-Boarding phase.

Games are learned by playing them. Let your players PLAY. Even if it’s not a game (ask @RomanRackwitz what it means).

Tutorials shoudl be FUN-ny. They have to be serious but entertaining. Remember the player willbe alone in tis short trip and it must offer a sense of progression

What happens if the players are beign followed without them knowing?

Leadership is a form of art. It is impossible to fake it. People will only follow others who they believe they deserve. We all do. Seth Godin explains leadership fantastically in his book Tribes. Everyone has the ability to create a movement and lead it.

When players have this ability within the system they will be able to have followers (YES, just like Twitter). It’s not the type of relationship that interacts every second with others, but being followed is a powerful motivator for most players.

Ah, fame. It makes people fight for attention all over the place. Imagine a classroom where grades are defined by how high the reputation of the players is? How about we base that reputation on the perception of the quality of the work each player produces.

Suddenly players will have to deliver GOOD work instead of “just right”.

Reputation is a great way to have players identify each others’ “general” ability. It doesn’t have to be  number and it definetely shouldn’t be domething specific but known… Something like “We know Ursula is the best at…[whatever]”.

Usually rating is expressed in stars (yes, cheeky, I know), but the point is to express their skill related to others. Even though it has something to do with other players it’s still something that defines the player on its own and its a great reference for new players to know where they stand and other players stand.

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

5 + 8 =

#Gamemechanics – Teamwork Relationships Category

#Gamemechanics – Teamwork Relationships Category

Teamwork Category #gamemechanics

A permanent relationship between players that allow them to attempt challenges together.

Building teams, guilds or any sort of group that will keep the players together facing challenges is an awesome way to promote cooperation and develop professional relationships within the system.

It occupies a different dynamic as teams can compete against each other and it’s very different to define the rules on how players can cooperate with others than if they face challenges together or against each other.

Teams must give the players a sense of belonging. Wether you are a citizen in a country or you subscribed to a fanclub you share the same objectives. This is the type of relationship you want to develop with teamwork in gamification.

We all have friends right? As a #gamemechanic, FRIENDING is used to show the players they have people they can call any time to help them. In the category description it’s stated that teamwork is a form of permanent relationship. Think of your friends in facebook and how the relationship work:

  • Only your friends can see your posts and photos
  • Only your friends can send you messages
  • You can only invite YOUR friends to your events, or maybe friends of friends

The point is that nobody is in constant contact with ALL their friends on facebook, however, you know that you can contact them as long as you are friends with them.

The same concept applies, the difference lies on how to use such friendship.

  • Only friends can buy your products
  • Only friends can see you online
  • Only friends can trade items
  • Only your friends can hire you

Remember: everything is more fun with others.

It matters not how you call them: TEAM, GUILD, GROUP, ASSOCIATION, COMPANY, WHATEVER. Guilds should always represent a common goal. Players who are part of the same team must share the same objectives. Usually, each player fulfills a different role in the group and so their job is always required to do something.

In guilds players not only share their views but may find friends, mentors, students and many other rewards that cannot be found outside.

The relationship between the players in the guild can be tricky. The environment can be of cooperation or competition (Rule number 1 of Fight Club)

In the end we all want to be part of something bigger. This mechanic appeals A LOT to purpose in the RAMP model.

Oh. Almost forgot. Players can belong to multiple guilds unless stated otherwise, because, why not?

Ever wondered if the kid who always got the homewrk right could be hired to do it for you?

How about we exchange some virtual money that was earned through 10 different tasks and now can be used to give other players some money so they can buy a better grade or get that new item they want?

Hiring can be VERY powerful but must be used with caution. You could end up with the “rich” kid wanting to REALLY py other players fr their work, however, if done right, it ends up becoming something as self-regulating as E-BAY or Air B&B.

This mechanic is connected with the POWER reward from the SAPS model. If a player CAN hire others, it means they have the power to do OTHER things and develop whatever they are on to.

Now, the KEY challenges each player MUST face shouldn’t be “hirable” (if that’s a word). Make sure that players’ challenges are balanced and the key elements in the journey are done by who must do it.

 

Bernardo Letayf

Bernardo Letayf

E.M.B.O.

As of August 2017, I occupy the 17th position in the Gamification Gurus Power 100! I am a Gamification Keynote Speaker & the evil mind behind the operation @bluerabbit, a gamification platform for education. I also developed three frameworks to teach/learn how to create gamification systems and build gamified content at the BLUErabbit Gamification Academy Right now we are developing BLUErabbit as a MOCC aside from all the original functions to transform the educational system. I have declared a world wide war on grades.

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